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Programming in Visual Basic 6.0 by Julia Bradley PDF 28: A Review and Summary



Programming in Visual Basic 6.0 by Julia Bradley PDF 28




Are you interested in learning how to program in one of the most popular and easy-to-use languages ever created? Do you want to create dynamic applications that can run on Windows, web, or mobile platforms? If so, then you should consider learning Visual Basic 6.0, the last version of the classic Visual Basic programming language.




programming in visual basic 6.0 by julia bradley pdf 28



In this article, I will introduce you to Programming in Visual Basic, Version 6.0, a book by Julia Case Bradley that covers everything you need to know about Visual Basic 6.0 programming. You will learn what Visual Basic 6.0 is, why you should learn it, how to get started with it, what are the main concepts of it, and what are the advanced topics of it.


By the end of this article, you will have a clear understanding of what Visual Basic 6.0 can do for you, and how you can use it to create amazing applications that can solve real-world problems.


What is Visual Basic 6.0?




Visual Basic is a programming language that was developed by Microsoft in the late 1980s as a tool for creating graphical user interfaces (GUIs) for Windows applications. It was designed to be easy to learn and use, especially for beginners and non-programmers. It was also one of the first languages to support object-oriented and event-driven programming, which are essential for modern software development.


Visual Basic 6.0 is the sixth and final version of the classic Visual Basic programming language, released in 1998. It is also known as VB6 or VB Classic. It is the most widely used and loved version of Visual Basic, with millions of developers and users around the world. It is still supported by Microsoft until 2024, and by many third-party tools and libraries.


Some of the features of Visual Basic 6.0 are:



  • It is a compiled language, which means that it converts the source code into executable files that can run faster and more efficiently.



  • It is a high-level language, which means that it abstracts away the low-level details of the hardware and operating system, and provides a simpler and more intuitive syntax and semantics.



  • It is a visual language, which means that it allows you to design your user interface by dragging and dropping graphical elements such as buttons, text boxes, labels, etc. on a form.



  • It is a BASIC language, which means that it inherits the syntax and features of the BASIC (Beginner's All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code) language, one of the oldest and most widely used programming languages in history.



  • It is an object-oriented language, which means that it supports the concepts of objects, classes, inheritance, polymorphism, encapsulation, etc. that allow you to model real-world entities and behaviors in your code.



  • It is an event-driven language, which means that it responds to user actions and other events that occur in your application, such as clicking a button, entering text, moving the mouse, etc.



Why learn Visual Basic 6.0?




You might be wondering why you should learn Visual Basic 6.0 in 2023, when there are newer and more advanced versions of Visual Basic available, such as Visual Basic .NET or Visual Basic for Applications (VBA). Here are some reasons why you should learn Visual Basic 6.0:



  • It is easy to learn and use. Visual Basic 6.0 has a simple and consistent syntax that is easy to understand and remember. It also has a rich set of built-in functions and controls that make programming tasks easier and faster. It also has a powerful and user-friendly IDE (Integrated Development Environment) that helps you write, debug, and test your code.



  • It is versatile and powerful. Visual Basic 6.0 can create various types of applications, such as desktop applications, web applications, mobile applications, games, etc. It can also interact with various technologies and platforms, such as databases, files, COM (Component Object Model), ActiveX (ActiveX controls), DLLs (Dynamic Link Libraries), etc. It can also extend and customize other applications that support VBA (Visual Basic for Applications), such as Microsoft Office, AutoCAD, etc.



  • It is popular and widely used. Visual Basic 6.0 is one of the most popular programming languages in the world, with millions of developers and users. It is also widely used in various industries and domains, such as education, business, finance, engineering, science, etc. It has a large and active community that provides support, resources, tutorials, forums, blogs, etc.



  • It is fun and rewarding. Visual Basic 6.0 allows you to create applications that are fun to use and rewarding to make. You can see the results of your code immediately on the screen. You can also create applications that solve real-world problems or express your creativity.



How to get started with Visual Basic 6.0?




If you are interested in learning Visual Basic 6.0 programming, you will need two things: a copy of Visual Basic 6.0 software and a copy of Programming in Visual Basic 6.0 by Julia Bradley PDF 28 book.


Downloading and installing Visual Basic 6.0




To download and install Visual Basic 6.0 on your computer, you will need to follow these steps:



] and click on the PDF icon to download the book.


  • Go to this link: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=5721 and click on the Download button to download the Visual Basic 6.0 Service Pack 6.



  • Extract the downloaded files to a folder on your computer.



  • Run the setup.exe file and follow the instructions to install Visual Basic 6.0 on your computer.



  • Restart your computer and launch Visual Basic 6.0 from the Start menu or the desktop shortcut.



Using the Visual Basic 6.0 IDE




When you launch Visual Basic 6.0, you will see the IDE (Integrated Development Environment), which is the main window where you will write and run your code. The IDE consists of several components, such as:



  • The Menu bar, which contains various menus that provide access to commands and options.



  • The Toolbar, which contains buttons that perform common tasks, such as creating a new project, saving a file, running a program, etc.



  • The Project Explorer, which shows the files and components that belong to your current project.



  • The Properties window, which shows and allows you to change the properties of the selected object, such as a form, a control, a variable, etc.



  • The Form Designer, which is where you design your user interface by adding and arranging graphical elements, such as forms, controls, menus, etc.



  • The Code Editor, which is where you write your code that defines the logic and behavior of your program.



  • The Immediate window, which is where you can enter and execute commands or expressions during debugging or testing.



  • The Object Browser, which shows and allows you to browse the objects, classes, methods, properties, events, etc. that are available in your project or in other libraries.



Writing your first Visual Basic 6.0 program




To write your first Visual Basic 6.0 program, you will need to follow these steps:



  • Create a new Standard EXE project by clicking on File > New Project > Standard EXE and clicking on OK.



  • Add a command button to your form by clicking on the Command Button tool in the Toolbox and drawing a rectangle on the form.



  • Change the caption of the command button to "Hello World" by clicking on the command button and changing the Caption property in the Properties window.



Add a code to display a message box when the command button is clicked by double-clicking on the command button and typing this code in the Code Editor: Private Sub Command1_Click() MsgBox "Hello World!" End Sub




  • Run your program by clicking on Run > Start or pressing F5. You should see your form with a command button that says "Hello World".



  • Click on the command button and you should see a message box that says "Hello World!". Congratulations! You have just written your first Visual Basic 6.0 program!



What are the main concepts of Visual Basic 6.0?




Now that you have learned how to create a simple Visual Basic 6.0 program, you might want to learn more about the main concepts of Visual Basic 6.0 programming language. In this section, I will introduce you to some of the fundamental concepts and syntax of Visual Basic 6.0 that you will need to know to write more complex and powerful programs.


Variables and data types




A variable is a name that represents a value that can change during the execution of your program. For example, you can use a variable to store the name of a user, the price of a product, the result of a calculation, etc.


A data type is a category of values that determines what kind of data a variable can store and what operations can be performed on it. For example, you can use different data types to store numbers, text, dates, logical values, etc.


To declare a variable in Visual Basic 6.0, you can use the Dim statement, followed by the name of the variable and optionally the data type. For example: Dim x As Integer 'declares an integer variable named x Dim y As String 'declares a string variable named y Dim z 'declares a variant variable named z


A variant is a special data type that can store any kind of data, but it is less efficient and more prone to errors than using a specific data type.


To assign a value to a variable, you can use the = operator, followed by the value or expression. For example: x = 10 'assigns the value 10 to x y = "Hello" 'assigns the value "Hello" to y z = x + y 'assigns the result of x + y to z


To display the value of a variable, you can use the MsgBox function, which shows a message box with the value. For example: MsgBox x 'displays the value of x MsgBox y 'displays the value of y MsgBox z 'displays the value of z


Some of the common data types in Visual Basic 6.0 are:



Data type


Description


Example values


Integer


A whole number between -32,768 and 32,767


-10, 0, 100, 32767


Long


A whole number between -2,147,483,648 and 2,147,483,647


-1000000, 0, 1000000, 2147483647


Single


A decimal number with up to 7 digits of precision


-3.14, 0, 1.23, 3.402823E+38


Double


A decimal number with up to 15 digits of precision


-3.14159, 0, 1.23456, 1.79769313486232E+308


String


A sequence of characters enclosed in quotation marks


"", "A", "Hello", "This is a string"


Boolean


A logical value that can be either True or False


True, False


Date


A date or time value enclosed in # symbols


#1/1/2023#, #12:00:00 AM#, #6/6/2023 6:58:29 AM#


Currency


A decimal number with up to 4 digits of precision and a fixed decimal point for monetary values


Operators and expressions




An operator is a symbol that performs a specific operation on one or more values or variables. For example, you can use operators to perform arithmetic, logical, or relational operations in your code.


An expression is a combination of values, variables, and operators that evaluates to a single value. For example, you can use expressions to assign values to variables, compare values, calculate results, etc.


Some of the common operators in Visual Basic 6.0 are:



Operator


Description


Example


Result


+


Addition


x = 10 + 5


x = 15


-


Subtraction


x = 10 - 5


x = 5


*


Multiplication


x = 10 * 5


x = 50


/


Division


x = 10 / 5


x = 2


\


Integer division


x = 10 \ 3


x = 3


Mod


Modulus (remainder)


x = 10 Mod 3


x = 1


^


Exponentiation (power)


x = 10 ^ 2


x = 100


=


Assignment or equality comparison


x = 10 'assignment x = y 'equality comparison x = x + 1 'increment by one x += 1 'same as above x -= 1 'decrement by one x *= 2 'multiply by two x /= 2 'divide by two x ^= 2 'raise to power of two x = 10 'x is 10 x = y 'True if x and y have the same value x = x + 1 'x is 11 x += 1 'x is 12 x -= 1 'x is 11 x *= 2 'x is 22 x /= 2 'x is 11 x ^= 2 'x is 121 x &= "Hello" 'x is "121Hello"


Less than


x


True if x is less than y


Less than or equal to


x


True if x is less than or equal to y


>


Greater than


x > y


True if x is greater than y


>=


Greater than or equal to


x >= y


True if x is greater than or equal to y


Not equal to


x y


True if x is not equal to y


And


Logical and


x And y


True if both x and y are True


Or


Logical or


x Or y


True if either x or y is True


Xor


Logical exclusive or


x Xor y


True if either x or y is True, but not both


Not


Logical not (negation)


Not x


True if x is False, and vice versa


Control structures




A control structure is a statement that controls the flow of execution of your program. For example, you can use control structures to make decisions, repeat actions, or jump to different parts of your code.


Some of the common control structures in Visual Basic 6.0 are:



The If...Then...Else...End If statement, which executes a block of code based on a condition. For example: If x > 10 Then MsgBox "x is greater than 10" ElseIf x = 10 Then MsgBox "x is equal to 10" Else MsgBox "x is less than 10" End If


  • This statement displays a different message depending on the value of x.



The Select Case...Case...End Select statement, which executes a block of code based on multiple conditions. For example: Select Case x Case Is > 10 MsgBox "x is greater than 10" Case Is = 10 MsgBox "x is equal to 10" Case Else MsgBox "x is less than 10"


  • This statement does the same thing as the previous one, but using a different syntax.



The For...Next statement, which executes a block of code a fixed number of times. For example: For i = 1 To 10 MsgBox "This is loop number " & i Next i


  • This statement displays a message 10 times, with the value of i increasing from 1 to 10.



The Do...Loop statement, which executes a block of code until a condition is met. For example: i = 1 Do While i


  • This statement does the same thing as the previous one, but using a different syntax.



The Exit statement, which exits a loop or a procedure prematurely. For example: For i = 1 To 10 If i = 5 Then Exit For End If MsgBox "This is loop number " & i Next i


  • This statement exits the loop when i reaches 5, and displays only 4 messages.



The Goto statement, which jumps to a specified line of code. For example: x = InputBox("Enter a number") If x


  • This statement jumps to the Negative label if x is negative, and displays a different message.



Procedures and functions




A procedure is a block of code that performs a specific task. A procedure can be called from another part of your code to execute the task. A procedure can have parameters, which are variables that pass values to and from the procedure.


A function is a special type of procedure that returns a value to the part of your code that called it. A function can also have parameters, like a procedure.


To define a procedure in Visual Basic 6.0, you can use the Sub...End Sub statement, followed by the name of the procedure and optionally the parameters. For example: Sub DisplayMessage(ByVal message As String) MsgBox message End Sub


This procedure displays a message in a message box. The ByVal keyword means that the parameter is passed by value, which means that a copy of the value is passed to the procedure, and any changes made to the parameter inside the procedure do not affect the original value.


To define a function in Visual Basic 6.0, you can use the Function...End Function statement, followed by the name of the function and optionally the parameters. You also need to assign a value to the function name inside the function. For example: Function Add(ByVal x As Integer, ByVal y As Integer) As Integer Add = x + y End Function


This function returns the sum of two integers. The As Integer keyword means that the function and its parameters are of integer data type.


To call a procedure or a function in Visual Basic 6.0, you can use its name followed by parentheses and optionally the arguments. For example: DisplayMessage "Hello World!" 'calls the DisplayMessage procedure with "Hello World!" as argument z = Add(10, 5) 'calls the Add function with 10 and 5 as arguments and assigns the return value to z data type. For example, you can use a collection to store a list of objects, such as forms, controls, files, etc. To create a collection in Visual Basic 6.0, you can use the New keyword, followed by the name of the collection class. For example: Dim books As New Collection 'creates a new collection object named books


To add or remove a value to or from a collection, you can use the Add or Remove methods of the collection object. For example: books.Add "Programming in Visual Basic 6.0" 'adds the value "Programming in Visual Basic 6.0" to books books.Add "Advanced Visual Basic 6.0" 'adds the value "Advanced Visual Basic 6.0" to books books.Remove 1 'removes the first value from books


To access a value from a collection, you can use the name of the collection followed by parentheses with the index or key of the value. For example: x = books(1) 'assigns the value of the first elemen


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